maps

Open Sourced Public Archaeological Recording in England and Wales

Scheduled:

Thu, 11/08/2012 - 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Track: B. Shared Data, DAMs, Collections Management
Room: Seneca

Submitter(s):

  1. Name: Daniel Pett
    Title: ICT Adviser
    Organization: The British Museum

Abstract:

Since 1996, the Portable Antiquities Scheme, housed at the British Museum, has encouraged the voluntary recording of public discovery of archaeological objects that would otherwise not make it into British Museums. This data has been made available to a worldwide audience online since 1999 and is now about to enter a new iteration which will enable further reuse and research potential. 

Session Description:

This paper will present the development of the Portable Antiquities Scheme's online presence since 1999 and how this has created an impact on the archaeology and museum sector in England and Wales. This significant corpus of data (now standing at over 750,000 objects and 400,000 images is a significant data provider for projects such as Europeana and Culture Grid and is frequently a provider of data for UK cultural hackdays.

Session Info

  • Type: Individual Paper
  • Keywords:
  • Relevance: Museum curators, educators, technologists with an emphasis on open source technology, maps and public discovery and recording.

The Whole Wide World: Content Development for Interactive Maps

Scheduled:

Thu, 11/08/2012 - 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Track: G. Evaluation, Labs, Production, External Engagement
Room: Spring

Submitter(s):

  1. Name: Michael Neault
    Title: Content Producer
    Organization: Second Story Interactive Studios

Abstract:

Interactivity brings a whole new dimension to the art of cartography. Maps are no longer static pieces of paper, they can move in a multitude of dimensions: up, down, backwards, forwards, inside, outside, even traveling back in time. With the added versatility of digital also comes complexity. The new breed of cartographers are more apt to be developers than geographers and more likely to be mathematicians than artists. Today’s maps are often a hybrid of Powers and Ten combined with something out of a Neal Stephenson science fiction novel. How can your institution harness the power of mapmaking to communicate information? This presentation will use a rich integration of visuals to communicate the evolution of maps and how they can be used to tell a story. Discussion points will include content strategy and development, interface design, data wrangling, and working with an interdisciplinary team to extend your capabilities.

Session Description:

The presentation will be divided into 5 main topics and will use many real-world examples to communicate the basics of interactive map making.
 

Session Info

  • Type: Individual Paper
  • Keywords:
  • Relevance: Target audience would be for education specialists, content developers, and strategists. The relevance is to provide accessible, practical tips for producing interactive maps, to discuss a range of inspiring examples from the field, and to share public resources available to museum professionals.

Collaborative Mapping & Documenting Cultural Places

Scheduled:

Sat, 11/19/2011 - 4:00am - 4:20am
Track:
Room: Montreal

Submitter(s):

  1. Name: Katie Filbert
    Title: Geo/Web Developer
    Organization: Wikimedia DC

Abstract:

Through the projects including OpenStreetMap and Wikipedia, it's possible to collaboratively map and document outdoor cultural places, and make use of the information in web and mobile apps, going beyond a basic Google Map mashup. Through the OpenStreetMap project, places that have been mapped include the National Zoo, Hirshhorn Sculpture Garden, and Arlington National Cemetery, and the Wikipedia community has documented and mapped public art, historic sites and monuments. This presentation will cover what the communities are doing and possibilities for cultural institutions to collaborate.

Session Description:

Through the projects including OpenStreetMap and Wikipedia, it's possible to collaboratively map and document outdoor cultural places, and make use of the information in web and mobile apps, going beyond a basic Google Map mashup.

Session Info

  • Type: Individual Paper
  • Keywords:
  • Relevance: